Lab Member Projects

 
Niroshana Anandasabapathy
Postdoctoral Fellow
Phone: 8374
E-mail: nanandasab@mail.rockefeller.edu
MD, PhD (2005), Program in Cancer Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr Anandasabapathy has studied the immune functions of dendritic cells in the brain. She is now studying the cellular requirements for vaccination through the skin and agents to improve vaccines in humans, bringing agents into Phase I clinical trials at Rockefeller University.

Scott Barbuto
Biomedical Fellow
Phone: 7416
E-mail: sbarbuto@mail.rockefeller.edu
Together with the Muir Lab, Mr Barbuto is developing approaches to introduce polypeptide antigens into antibodies that target to receptors on dendritic cells, to better study and improve the immune response to these antigens in the intact animal and eventually in human patients.

Gaelle Breton
Postdoctoral Associate
Phone: 8193
E-mail: gbreton@rockefeller.edu
PhD (2010), in Immunology, University of Montreal, Canada
Dr Bretonís focus is the study of human immunology, particularly the development and the properties of blood dendritic cells as well as the contribution of dendritic cell subsets to vaccine responses in immunized individuals.

Karen Bulloch
Research Associate Professor; Director, Neuroimmunology & Inflammation Prog
Phone: 7626
E-mail: bulloch@mail.rockefeller.edu
http://lab.rockefeller.edu/mcewen/neuroimmunology
Ph.D., Dept. of Neurosciences, School of Medicine, Univ. of CA, San Diego
Dr. Bulloch is the Director of the Neuroimmunology and Inflammation Program.
Currently, the program's scientists are working on evaluating the function of brain dendritic cells following viral infection and in mouse models of inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Additional work is being carried out on understanding the role of these cells in development and in neuroendocrine-immune interactions.
Bulloch K, Miller MM, Gal-Toth J, Milner TA, Gottfried-Blackmore A, Waters EM, Kaunzner UW, Liu K, Lindquist R, Nussenzweig MC, Steinman RM, McEwen BS. CD11c/EYFP transgene illuminates a discrete network of dendritic cells within the embryonic, neonatal, adult, and injured mouse brain. J COMP NEUROL 2008 JUN 10;508(5):687-710
D'Agostino PM, Kwak C, Vecchiarelli HA, Toth JG, Miller JM, Masheeb Z, McEwen BS, Bulloch K. Viral-induced encephalitis initiates distinct and functional CD103+ CD11b+ brain dendritic cell populations within the olfactory bulb.
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 2012 Apr 17;109(16):6175-80. Epub 2012 Apr 2.
See website for other publicatios

Marina Caskey
Instructor in Clinical Investigation
Phone: 7396
E-mail: mcaskey@mail.rockefeller.edu
MD (1998), Universidade Federal de Sergipe Brazil. Dr. Caskey, trained in Infectious Diseases, is now studying the immune responses elicited by a DEC-205 monoclonal antibody HIV-1 vaccine. She is also working to bring this vaccine into Phase I trials at The Rockefeller University Hospital

Cheolho Cheong
Research Associate
Phone: 7875
E-mail: ccheong@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (2003), Seoul National University, South Korea. The research interests of Dr. Cheong focus on understanding the functions of dendritic cell subsets: Their hematopoietic origins, functions and differential capacity to handle antigens in the setting of non-sterile inflammation (microbial infections) and sterile inflammation (atherosclerosis, autoimmunity, and cancer).

Juliana Idoyaga
Postdoctoral Associate
Phone: 8374
E-mail: ijuliana@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (2007) Autonomous University, Mexico. Dr. Idoyaga is studying the targeting of antigens to dendritic cells within intact lymphoid tissues. The antigens are incorporated into different monoclonal antibodies that react with uptake receptors on dendritic cells. Because the receptors are expressed on different cell subsets in situ, the targeting approach will help dissect the function of these subsets in situ.

Kayo Inaba
Adjunct Faculty
E-mail: kayo@lif.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Maria Paula Longhi
Postdoctoral Fellow
Phone: 7986
E-mail: mlonghi@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (2006) Cardiff University, United Kingdom. Dr. Longhi is studying the maturation or differentiation of dendritic cells in vivo to understand how immune adjuvants work. In addition to capturing and processing antigens, dendritic cells must receive stimuli that guide their further development. The pathway of maturation determines the outcome of the immune response. Dr. Longhi is studying the outcome of different maturation stimuli in order to select an optimal regiment for dendritic cell based vaccination of humans.

Carol Moberg
Senior Research Associate
Phone: 8777
E-mail: moberg@mail.rockefeller.edu

View:

Rene Dubos: Friend of the Good Earth book cover

PhD (1978), Columbia University, New York. Dr. Moberg specializes in research and writing about 20th century biomedical sciences; her articles have appeared in Scientific American, Science, The Journal of Experimental Medicine, and Perspectives in Biology and Medicine. She is also co-curator of the universityís historic instrument collection, documenting the inventions created in Rockefellerís shops and their scientific impact. Author of Renť Dubos, Friend of the Good Earth (2005) and co-editor and contributor to Launching the Antibiotic Era (1990). A book length manuscript, Entering an Unseen World: The Scientific Origins of Modern Cell Biology, is nearing completion.

Svetlana Mojsov
Research Associate Professor
Phone: 8108
E-mail: mojsov@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (1978), The Rockefeller University, New York. Dr. Mojsovís long-standing interests have been in understanding how peptides and small proteins regulate physiological processes in healthy and disease states. She has applied her expertise in the chemical synthesis of peptides and small proteins to a wide range of studies, starting with the discovery of glucagon-like peptide1 (GLP-1) and its key role in insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. Based on Dr. Mojsovís work, Novo Nordisk developed a GLP-1 analog as a new therapeutic agent for type 2 diabetes, recently approved for use in Europe, Japan, China and USA under the trade name Victoza. Most recently Dr. Mojsovís collaborative work with members of Dr. Steinman group has been focused on developing a proteomic approach to identify the peptide repertoire presented by the MHC complex on dendritic cells (DC) after immunizations with proteins that are specifically delivered to dendritic cells. This work is part of the effort to develop dendritic cell-based vaccines against HIV and other infectious agents.

Carl Nathan
Adjunct Faculty

Maggi Pack
Senior Research Associate
Phone: 8192
E-mail: packm@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (1987), New York University. By applying monoclonal antibodies to frozen sections, Dr. Pack is trying to identify subsets of dendritic cells in vivo, to better understand how dendritic cell mediated immune responses are initiated. This research is part of vaccine development in the lab.

Chae Gyu Park
Research Assistant Professor
Phone: 7874
E-mail: parkc@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (1997), The Rockefeller University, New York. Dr. Park studies various lectins that are expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages. His lab has identified a family of mouse SIGN genes that consist of 5 members, i.e. DC-SIGN, SIGN-R1, -R2, -R3, and -R4. SIGN-R1 is a receptor for many microbial polysaccharides, and DC-SIGN marks monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell. Dr. Park is studying the functions of lectins expressed on dendritic cells, such as DEC-205, Langerin, and DC-SIGN, with application to vaccine development.

Sarah Schlesinger
Associate Professor of Clinical Investigation
Phone: 7763
E-mail: schless@mail.rockefeller.edu
MD (1985), Rush University School of Medicine, Chicago.
Board-certified Pathologist, Cornell/New York Hospital.
Dr. Schlesinger is conducting AIDS vaccine studies in the Rockefeller University Hospital and serves as Project Manager for the Grand Challenges in Global Health program.

Christine Trumpfheller
Senior Research Associate and Director of Preclinical Studies
Phone: 7986
E-mail: trumpfc@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (1998), Johannes Gutenberg-Universitšt, Mainz, Germany
Dr. Trumpfhellerís research has been focusing on the design and preclinical evaluation of novel HIV protein vaccine candidates that target HIV antigens to the dendritic cell receptor DEC-205 in vivo.

Bei Wang
Postdoctoral Associate
Phone: 8374
E-mail: bwang@mail.rockefeller.edu
PhD (2007), University of Florida, Gainesville. Dr. Wang is analyzing the capacity of dendritic cells to induce immunity to tumor antigens. She is incorporating these antigens into antibodies that target to defined receptors on dendritic cells in vivo.

Jacqueline Chiappetta
Administrative Coordinator
Phone: 7763
E-mail: chiappj@mail.rockefeller.edu

Marguerite Nulty
Administrative Assistant
Phone: 7763
E-mail: nultym@mail.rockefeller.edu

Irina Shimeliovich
Research Specialist
Phone: 7986
E-mail: shimeli@mail.rockefeller.edu