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Lab Members

 

Kronauer lab fall 2015

Fall 2015

Back (from left to right): Sean McKenzie (PhD student), Buck Trible (PhD student), Yuko Ulrich (postdoc), Leonora Olivos Cisneros (research specialist), Ingrid Fetter-Pruneda (postdoc), Sylvia Chang (research specialist)

Middle (from left to right): Asaf Gal (postdoc), Christoph von Beeren (postdoc), Daniel Kronauer (PI), Peter Oxley (postdoc), Ian Butler (PhD student)

Front (from left to right): Vikram Chandra (PhD student), Tom Hart (rotation student), Aniek Ivens (postdoc)

Missing: Jonathan Saragosti (postdoc)

 
Ian ButlerIan Butler profile
Ph.D. student
E-mail: ibutler"at"rockefeller.edu

Ian is generally interested in evolutionary genetics and speciation. He joined the Kronauer lab in 2012, where he uses population genetics to study a hybrid population of army ants in Kenya. Ian graduated from the University of Chicago in 2009 with a B.A. in biology with honors where he studied the process of speciation in the Drosophila melanogaster species group as an undergraduate. Before joining the Kronauer lab, Ian worked for three years as a tech in labs at the University of Chicago and Harvard.

 
 

 
 

Publications:

  1. Butler, I. A., Siletti, K., Oxley, P. R., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2014): Conserved microsatellites in ants enable population genetic and colony pedigree studies across a wide range of species. PLoS ONE 9: e107334.

  2. Gavin-Smyth, J., Wang, Y.-C., Butler, I., Ferguson, E. L. (2013): A genetic network conferring canalization to a bistable patterning system in DrosophilaCurrent Biology 23: 2296-2302.
  3. Groen, S. C., Whiteman, N. K., Bahrami, A. K., Wilczek, A. M., Cui, J., Russell, J. A., Cibrian-Jaramillo, A., Butler, I. A., Rana, J. D., Huang, G.-H., Bush, J., Ausubel, F. M., Pierce, N. E. (2013): Pathogen-triggered ethylene signaling mediates systemic-induced susceptibility to herbivory in Arabidopsis. The Plant Cell 25: 4755-4766.
  4. Matute, D. R., Butler, I. A., Turissini, D. A., Coyne, J. A. (2010): A test of the snowball theory for the rate of evolution of hybrid incompatibilities. Science 329: 1518-1521.
  5. Matute, D. R., Butler, I. A., Coyne, J. A. (2009): Little effect of the tan locus on pigmentation in female hybrids between Drosophila santomea and D. melanogaster. Cell 139: 1180-1188.

Sylvia Chang

Sylvia Chang
Research Assistant
E-mail: nchang"at"rockefeller.edu

Sylvia is interested in evolution and behavioral plasticity in social organisms. She received her M.S. from National Taiwan University, where she worked on seed dispersal by primates. After that she developed an interest in the genetics of social insects and worked with John Wang at Academia Sinica to study supergene evolution in fire ants. She joined the Laboratory of Social Evolution and Behavior as a research assistant in 2015, where she is developing protocols for CRISPR/Cas-mediated genome editing in the clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroi.

 

Ingrid Fetter-Pruneda profileIngrid Fetter-Pruneda
Postdoctoral Associate (Fulbright Fellowship 2011-2012; Women & Science Fellowship 2014-2015)
E-mail: ifetter"at"rockefeller.edu

Ingrid earned her B.S. in biology with honors from the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) in 2005. As an undergraduate, she studied the role of chromatin remodeling during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. From the beginning, her interests have focused on the mechanisms underlying phenotypic plasticity. She went on to pursue her Ph.D. at the Biomedical Research Institute, UNAM, where she worked on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of cross-modal plasticity in blinded rats. Ingrid joined the Kronauer lab in fall 2011 as a Fulbright Scholar and is currently a visiting Ph.D. student. Ingrid is studying the epigenetic basis of behavior in the parthenogenetic ant Cerapachys biroi.


Publications:

  1. Oxley, P. R.#, Ji, L.#, Fetter-Pruneda, I., McKenzie, S. K., Li, C., Hu, H., Zhang, G.*, Kronauer, D. J. C.* (2014): The genome of the clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroiCurrent Biology 24: 451-458. #/*Contributed equally.
  2. Fetter-Pruneda, I., Geovannini-Acuña, H., Santiago, C., Ibarrarán-Viniegra, A.S., Martínez-Martínez, E., et al. (2013): Shifts in developmental timing, and not increased levels of experience-dependent neuronal activity, promote barrel expansion in the primary somatosensory cortex of rats enucleated at birth. PLoS ONE 8: e54940.
  3. Báez-Saldaña, A., Fetter-Pruneda, I., Fuentes-Farías, A. L., Granados-Rojas, L., Gutiérrez-Ospina, G., Martínez-Méndez, R., Meléndez-Herrera, E., Mendoza-Torreblanca, J., Sandoval-Velasco, M. (2009): Brain plasticity, signal transduction and epigenesis: A missing link revealed. Annual Review of Biomedical Sciences 11:114-122.
Asaf GalAsaf Gal
Postdoctoral Fellow (Human Frontiers Science Program Fellowship 2015-)
Email: agal"at"rockefeller.edu
 
Asaf’s main interest is the collective behavior of ants as an example for functional self organization. He studies the way an ant colony self-organizes and re-organizes in response to external signals and cues, in a way that serves a functional need. Generally, Asaf is enthusiastic about the interface between biology, physics and the study of functional systems, or in other words, the physical description of the way function emerges out of the dynamics of biological components. He has a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering and Physics from the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, and has received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he worked on the dynamics of single neurons and neural networks, combining theoretical and experimental work. 
 
 
Publications:
  1. Soudry, D., Di-Castro, D., Gal, A., Kolodny A., Kvatinsky S. (2015): Memristor-Based Multilayer Neural Networks With Online Gradient Descent Training.IEEE Transactions in Neural Networks and Learning Systems.
     
  2. Reinartz, S., Biro, I., Gal, A., Giugliano M., S. Marom (2014): Synaptic population dynamics: impacts on single neuron response fluctuations. Frontiers in Neural Circuits.
  3. Gal, A., Marom, S (2014): Single neuron response fluctuations: A self-organized criticality point of view. Criticality in Neural Systems. 
  4. Gal, A., Marom, S. (2013): Self-organized criticality in single neuron excitability. Physical Review E.
  5. Gal, A., Marom, S. (2013): Entrainment of the intrinsic dynamics of single isolated neurons by natural-like input. The Journal of Neuroscience.
  6. Wallach, A., Eytan, D., Gal, A., Zrenner, C., and Marom, S. (2011): Neuronal response clamp. Frontiers in Neuroengineering.
  7. Gal, A., Eytan, D., Wallach, A., Sandler, M., Schiller, J., Marom, S. (2010): Dynamics of excitability over extended timescales in cultured cortical neurons. The Journal of Neuroscience.
  8. Kermany, E., Gal, A., Lyakhov, V., Meir, R., Marom, S., Eytan, D. (2010): Tradeoffs and constraints on neural representation in networks of cortical neurons.The Journal of Neuroscience.
  9. Marom, S., Meir, R., Braun, E., Gal, A., Kermany, E,. Eytan, D. (2009): On the precarious path of reverse neuro-engineering. Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience.
  10. Shahaf, G.*, Eytan, D.*, Gal, A.*, Kermany, E., Lyakhov, V., Zrenner, C., Marom, S. (2008): Order-based representation in random networks of cortical neurons. PLoS Computational Biology. *Contributed equally.
Aniek Ivens profile

Aniek Ivens                        Download CV and list of publications
Postdoctoral Fellow (Niels Stensen Stichting Fellowship 2013-2014; Rubicon Fellowship 2014; Marie Curie Outgoing Fellowship 2014-)
E-mail: aivens"at"rockefeller.edu

Aniek is interested in the evolution and ecology of mutualisms, cooperation between different species. During her B.Sc. in Biology (Wageningen University) and top-M.Sc. in Evolutionary Biology (University of Groningen) she studied these interactions in fungus-growing ants and termites. During her PhD (shared between Groningen and the University of Copenhagen) she combined theoretical modeling with empirical work on another example of farming practices by social insects: underground Lasius ants farming root-aphids. In 2013 she joined the Laboratory of Insect Social Evolution as a Niels Stensen fellow, now extending her studies of subterranean ant-aphid mutualisms to North American species and their gut microbes.

Publications:

  1. Ivens, A. B. F.*, von Beeren, C.*, Blüthgen, N., Kronauer, D. J. C. (in press): Studying the complex communities of ants and their symbionts using ecological network analysis. Annual Review of Entomology. *Contributed equally.
  2. Ivens, A. B. F. (2015): Cooperation and conflict in ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) farming mutualisms – a review. Myrmecological News 21: 19-36.
  3. Werner, G. D. A., Strassmann, J. E., Ivens, A. B. F., Engelmoer, D. J. P., Verbruggen, E., Queller, D. C., Noe, R., Collins Johnson, N., Hammerstein, P., Kiers, E. T. (2014): Evolution of microbial markets. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 111: 1237-1244. Cover Story.
  4. Ivens, A. B. F., Kronauer, D. J. C., Pen, I., Weissing, F. J., Boomsma, J. J. (2012): Dispersal and reproduction in an ant-associated root aphid community. Molecular Ecology 21: 4257-4269.
  5. Ivens, A. B. F., Kronauer, D. J. C., Pen, I, Weissing, F. J., Boomsma, J. J. (2012): Ants farm subterranean aphids mostly in single clone groups – an example of prudent husbandry for carbohydrates and proteins? BMC Evolutionary Biology 12: 106.
  6. Ivens, A. B. F., Kronauer, D. J. C., Boomsma, J. J. (2011): Characterisation and cross-amplification of polymorphic microsatellite loci in ant-associated root-aphids. Conservation Genetics Resources 3: 73-77.
  7. Ivens, A. B. F., Nash, D. R., Poulsen, M., Boomsma, J. J. (2009): Caste-specific symbiont policing by workers of Acromyrmex fungus-growing ants. Behavioral Ecology 20: 378-384.
  8. Ivens, A. B. F., Shuker, D. M., Beukeboom, L. W., Pen, I. (2009): Host acceptance and sex allocation of Nasonia wasps in response to conspecifics and heterospecifics. Proceedings of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 276: 3663-3669.

Daniel Kronauer profileDaniel Kronauer                    Download CV and list of publications
Assistant Professor and Head of Lab
E-mail: dkronauer"at"rockefeller.edu

Daniel has been fascinated with ants since the age of five and still enjoys nothing more than flipping rocks to see what lives underneath. He is interested in all aspects of social evolution and behavior, especially in social insects. Daniel received his Diploma in Biology from the University of Wuerzburg, where he worked on the evolution of slavery in honeypot ants. During his Ph.D. at the University of Copenhagen, he studied the reproductive biology and population genetics of army ants. He continued his work on army ants as a postdoc at the University of Lausanne and as a Junior Fellow at the Harvard Society of Fellows, before joining Rockefeller University in 2011. Daniel is a 2012 Searle Scholar, a 2012 NIH Director's New Innovator Award recipient, a 2014 Klingenstein-Simons Fellowship Award recipient, and a 2015 Pew Biomedical Scholar.

Sean McKenzie profileSean McKenzie
Ph.D. student
E-mail: smckenzie"at"rockefeller.edu

Sean is interested in the evolution of coordination and communication in social organisms, and currently works to understand the molecular basis of pheromone perception in Cerapachys biroi. By combining comparative genomic, transcriptomic, behavioral, and neurobiological approaches he hopes to identify genes and neural circuits necessary for communication and elucidate how they evolve to facilitate sociality. Sean graduated summa cum laude from The University of the South, where he obtained departmental honors using geospatial information systems to understand forest ecology. During undergraduate studies he also worked on chemical communication in Neotropical army ants and temperate termites as well as the behavioral ecology of captive free-range Lemur catta.

 

Publications:

  1. McKenzie, S. K., Oxley, P. R., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2014): Comparative genomics and transcriptomics in ants provide new insights into the evolution and function of odorant binding and chemosensory proteins. BMC Genomics 15: 718.

  2. Oxley, P. R.#, Ji, L.#, Fetter-Pruneda, I., McKenzie, S. K., Li, C., Hu, H., Zhang, G.*, Kronauer, D. J. C.* (2014): The genome of the clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroiCurrent Biology 24: 451-458. #/*Contributed equally.

Leonora Olivos-CisnerosLeonora Olivos-Cisneros
Research Specialist
E-mail: lolivos"at"rockefeller.edu

Leonora received her BSc degree in Basic Biomedical Research from the College of Medicine at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in 2007. She currently is a PhD candidate in Biomedical Science at the Biomedical Research Institute at UNAM. Leonora's scientific interests are related to neurodevelopmental biology and how cells regulate and coordinate division and differentiation. She has many years of experience working in diverse experimental procedures from animal handling to cell culture and molecular biology. Leonora joined the Laboratory of Insect Social Evolution to assist in the organization and maintenance of the lab, as well as to participate in ongoing projects and to develop new experimental strategies within her area of expertise and beyond.

 

Publications:

  1. Jiménez-Trejo, F., Olivos-Cisneros, L., Mendoza-Torreblanca, J., Díaz-Sintra, S., Meléndez-Herrera, E., Báez-Saldaña, A., Padilla-Cortés, P., Gutiérrez-Ospina, G., Fuentes-Farías, A. (2011): Sensory neurons in the spinal cord of nominal female embryos in the marine turtle Lepidochelys olivacea respond to shifts in incubation temperature: implications for temperature dependent sex determination. Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology 2:1-7.
  2. Prieto-Gómez, B., Velázquez-Paniagua, M., Olivos-Cisneros, L., Reyes-Vázquez, C., Jiménez-Trejo, F., Reyesa, M. E., Mendoza-Torreblanca, J., Gutiérrez-Ospina, G. (2008): Melatonin attenuates the decrement of dendritic protein MAP-2 immuno-staining in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 fields of the aging male rat. Neuroscience Letters 448:56-61.
Peter Oxley profile

Peter Oxley
Postdoctoral Fellow (Leon Levy Fellowship in Mind, Brain, and Behavior 2012-)
E-mail: poxley"at"rockefeller.edu

Peter has explored the topics of genetics and behaviour from a variety of perspectives: a B.Sc. in molecular biology and genetics, a graduate diploma in genetic counseling, and an honours year and Ph.D. studying honey bee reproductive and hygienic behaviour.
After working on the genetics of a thelytokous parasitic honey bee clone at Sydney University, Peter joined the Kronauer lab in 2011 to work on the genomics of the thelytokous ant, Cerapachys biroi.
Peter has also dabbled in lecturing, running high school science workshops and appearing on children’s television.



Publications:

  1. Libbrecht, R.*, Oxley, P. R.*, Keller, L., Kronauer, D. J. C. (in press): Robust DNA methylation in the clonal raider ant brain. Current Biology. *Contributed equally.
  2. Chapman, N. C., Beekman, M., Allsopp, M. H., Rinderer, T. E., Lim, J., Oxley, P. R., Oldroyd, B. P. (2015): Inheritance of thelytoky in the honey bee Apis mellifera capensis. Heredity 114: 584-592.
  3. Butler, I. A., Siletti, K., Oxley, P. R., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2014): Conserved microsatellites in ants enable population genetic and colony pedigree studies across a wide range of species. PLoS ONE 9: e107334.
  4. McKenzie, S. K., Oxley, P. R., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2014): Comparative genomics and transcriptomics in ants provide new insights into the evolution and function of odorant binding and chemosensory proteins. BMC Genomics 15: 718.

  5. Oxley, P. R.#, Ji, L.#, Fetter-Pruneda, I., McKenzie, S. K., Li, C., Hu, H., Zhang, G.*, Kronauer, D. J. C.* (2014): The genome of the clonal raider ant Cerapachys biroiCurrent Biology 24: 451-458. #/*Contributed equally.
  6. Libbrecht, R., Oxley, P. R., Kronauer, D. J. C., Keller, L. (2013): Ant genomics sheds light on the molecular regulation of social organization. Genome Biology 14: 212.
  7. Goudie, F., Allsopp, M. H., Beekman, M., Oxley, P. R., Lim, J., Oldroyd, B. P. (2012): Maintenance and loss of heterozygosity in a thelytokous lineage of honey bees (Apis mellifera capensis). Evolution 66: 1897-1906.
  8. Drewell, R. A., Lo N., Oxley, P. R., Oldroyd, B. P. (2012): Kin conflict in insect societies: a new epigenetic perspective. Trends in Ecology & Evolution 27: 367-373.
  9. Oxley P. R., Spivak M., Oldroyd B. P. (2010): Six quantitative trait loci influence task thresholds for hygienic behaviour in honeybees (Apis mellifera). Molecular Ecology 19:1452-1461.
  10. Oxley P. R., Hinhumpatch P., Gloag R., Oldroyd B. P. (2010): Genetic evaluation of a novel system for controlled mating of the honey bee. Journal of Heredity 101: 334-338.
  11. Oxley P. R., Oldroyd B. P. (2010): The genetic architecture of honey bee breeding. Advances in Insect Physiology 39:83-118.
  12. Oxley P. R., Oldroyd B. P. (2009): Mitochondrial sequencing reveals five separate origins of ‘black’ Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in eastern Australian commercial colonies. Journal of Economic Entomology 102:480-484.
  13. Oxley PR, Ho G, Oldroyd BP (2008): Development of two markers for hygienic behaviour of honeybees. Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation, Barton, ACT. Publication 08/092.
  14. Oxley P. R., Thompson G. J., Oldroyd B. P. (2008): Four quantitative trait loci that influence worker sterility in the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Genetics 179:1337-1343.
Jonathan Saragosti profile

Jonathan Saragosti
Postdoctoral Associate (Kravis Fellowship 2012-2013)
E-mail: jsaragosti"at"rockefeller.edu

During his Ph.D. at the Curie Institute in Paris, Jonathan performed experiments to study collective migration of chemotactic bacteria in microfluidic channels. His current project in the Kronauer lab focuses on the influence of social interactions on division of labor in clonal ant colonies. He is currently developing an experimental setup to automatically track individual and social behaviors of individually tagged ants over extended periods of time in controlled environments. This project is conducted in collaboration with the Leibler lab at Rockefeller University.




Publications :

  1. Saragosti, J., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2013): Animal behavior: The Truman Show for ants. Dispatch. Current Biology 23: R568-R570.
  2. Saragosti, J., Silberzan, P., Buguin, A. (2012): Modeling E. coli tumbles by rotational diffusion. Implications for chemotaxis. PLoS ONE 7: e35412.

  3. Saragosti, J., Calvez, V., Bournaveas, N., Perthame, B., Buguin, A., Silberzan, P. (2011): Directional persistence of chemotactic bacteria in a traveling concentration wave. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 108: 16235–16240.
  4. Saragosti, J., Calvez, V., Bournaveas, N., Buguin, A., Silberzan, P., Perthame, B. (2010): Mathematical description of bacterial traveling pulses. PLoS Computational Biology 6: e1000890.

Waring "Buck" Trible profileWaring "Buck" Trible
Ph.D. student
E-mail: wtrible"at"rockefeller.edu

Buck wishes to use ants to advance the study of evolutionary genetics. During his undergraduate, he worked with Ken Ross and Dietrich Gotzek to study the genetic basis of social polymorphism in fire ants. He also worked with Patrick Stephens and John Gittleman to test macroevolutionary theories of ant species richness and phylogenetic diversity. Currently he is working to develop the Cas/CRISPR genome engineering platform in the species Cerapachys biroi, which he hopes to use to describe the genetic architecture that allowed worker/queen caste determination to evolve in ants..

 

 

 

Publications:

  1. Trible, W., Ross, K. G. (2016): Chemical communication of queen supergene status in an ant. Journal of Evolutionary Biology. Online early.
  2. Trible, W., Carroll, R. (2014): Manipulating tropical fire ants to reduce the coffee berry borer. Ecological Entomology 39: 603–609.
Yuko Ulrich

Yuko Ulrich
Postdoctoral Fellow (Swiss National Science Foundation Fellowship 2012-2013; Women & Science Fellowship 2013-2014; Swiss National Science Foundation Fellowship 2014-)
E-mail: yulrich"at"rockefeller.edu

Yuko is interested in the regulation of labor and reproduction in animal societies, with a focus on the interplay between social organization and immune function. Yuko received her M.S. from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, where she worked on the sociogenetics of halictine bees. She then did a Ph.D. at ETH Zurich, where she investigated the evolutionary ecology of multiple infections and disease transmission in a trypanosome-bumblebee system.

Publications:

  1. Ulrich, Y., Burns, D., Libbrecht, R., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2016): Ant larvae regulate worker foraging behavior and ovarian activity in a dose-dependent manner. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. Online early.
  2. Ulrich, Y., Schmid-Hempel, P. (2015): The distribution of parasite strains among hosts affects disease spread in a social insect. Infection, Genetics and Evolution 32: 348-353.
  3. Ulrich, Y., Schmid-Hempel, P. (2012): Host modulation of parasite competition in multiple infections. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 279: 2982-2989.
  4. Ulrich, Y., Sadd, B. M., Schmid-Hempel, P. (2011): Strain filtering and transmission of a mixed infection in a social insect. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 24: 354-362.
  5. Ulrich, Y., Perrin, N., Chapuisat, M. (2009): Flexible social organization and high incidence of drifting in the sweat bee, Halictus scabiosaeMolecular Ecology 18: 1791-1800.
  6. Berset-Brändli, L., Jaquiéry, J., Broquet, T., Ulrich, Y., Perrin, N. (2008): Extreme heterochiasmy and nascent sex chromosomes in European tree frogs. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B 275: 1577-1585.

Christoph von Beeren profileChristoph von Beeren               CV and research description can be found here
Postdoctoral Fellow (German Research Foundation Fellowship 2013-2015; Bristol-Myers Squibb Postdoctoral Fellowship 2015-)
E-mail: cvonbeeren"at"rockefeller.edu

Christoph is an ecologist who is mainly interested in animal behavior and species interactions. His work covers such different fields as foraging behavior, taxonomy, chemical and behavioral ecology, parasitology, and evolution. The diverse associations between ants and their symbionts, so-called myrmecophiles (=ant lovers), are his study systems of choice. How these myrmecophiles exploit ant societies, how they outwit the chemical recognition system of their host, and how the host counter-adapts were the main topics of his PhD thesis. Currently, he is studying the complex host-parasite network of Eciton army ants and their associated myrmecophiles. His main focus is on the myrmecophiles’ biodiversity and life history adaptations.

 

Publications:

  1. Ivens, A. B. F.*, von Beeren, C.*, Blüthgen, N., Kronauer, D. J. C. (in press): Studying the complex communities of ants and their symbionts using ecological network analysis. Annual Review of Entomology. *Contributed equally.
  2. von Beeren, C., Maruyama, M., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2016): Cryptic diversity, high host specificity and reproductive synchronization in army ant-associated Vatesus beetles. Molecular Ecology. Online early.
  3. von Beeren, C., Stoeckle, M. Y., Xia, J., Burke, G., Kronauer, D. J. C. (2015): Interbreeding among deeply divergent mitochondrial lineages in the American cockroach (Periplaneta americana). Scientific Reports 5: 8297.
  4. Ott, R., von Beeren, C., Hashim, R., Witte, V., Harvey S. (2015): Sicariomorpha, a new myrmecophilous goblin spider genus (Araneae, Oonopidae) associated with Asian army ants. American Museum Novitates 3843: 1-14.
  5. Fikacek, M., Maruyama, M., Komatsu, T., von Beeren, C., Vondracek D., Short A. (2015): Protosternini (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae) corroborated as monophyletic and its larva described for the first time: a review of the myrmecophilous genus Sphaerocetum. Invertebrate Systematics 29: 23-36.
  6. von Beeren, C., Mair, M. M., Witte, V. (2014): Discovery of a second mushroom harvesting ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Malayan tropical rainforest. Myrmecological News 20: 37-42.
  7. von Beeren, C., Lizon a l'Allemand, S., Hashim, R., Witte, V. (2014): Collective exploitation of a temporally unpredictable food source: mushroom harvesting by the ant Euprenolepis procera.Animal Behaviour 89: 71-77.
  8. von Beeren, C., Hashim, R., Witte, V. (2012): The social integration of a myrmecophilous spider does not depend exclusively on chemical mimicry. Journal of Chemical Ecology 38: 262-271.
  9. von Beeren, C., Pohl, S., Witte, V. (2012): On the use of adaptive resemblance terms in chemical ecology. Psyche. Article ID 635761, doi:10.1155/2012/635761.
  10. von Beeren, C., Schulz, S., Hashim, R., Witte, V. (2011): Acquisition of chemical recognition cues facilitates integration into ant societies. BMC Ecology 11: 30.
  11. Mendes, L. F., von Beeren, C., Witte, V. (2011): Malayatelura ponerophila – a new genus and species of silverfish (Zygentoma, Insecta) from Malaysia, living in Leptogenys army-ant colonies (Formicidae). Deutsche Entomologische Zeitschrift 58:193-200.
  12. von Beeren, C., Maruyama, M., Rosli, H., Witte, V. (2011): Differential host defense against multiple parasites in ants. Evolutionary Ecology 25: 259-276.
  13. Maruyama, M., von Beeren, C., Witte, V. (2010): Myrmecophilous aleocharine rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) associated with Leptogenys Roger, 1861 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) I. Review of three genera associated with L. processionalis (Jerdon, 1851). Zookeys 59: 47-60.
  14. Maruyama, M., von Beeren, C., Witte, V. (2010): Aleocharine rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) associated with Leptogenys Roger, 1861 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) II. Two new genera and species associated with L. borneensis Wheeler, 1919. Zookeys 59: 61-72.
  15. Disney, R. H. L., Lizon à l'Allemand, S., von Beeren, C., Witte, V. (2009): A new genus and new species of scuttle flies (Diptera: Phoridae) from colonies of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Malaysia. Sociobiology 53: 1-12.
  16. Kistner, D. H., von Beeren, C., Witte, V. (2008): Redescription of the generitype of Trachydonia and a new host record for Maschwitzia ulrichi (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). Sociobiology 52: 497-524.
  17. Sommer, S., von Beeren, C., Wehner, R. (2008): Multiroute memories in desert ants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A. 105: 317-322.

Former postdocs and graduate students

Romain Libbrecht profileRomain Libbrecht                   Download CV and list of publications
Postdoctoral Fellow (Marie Curie Outgoing Fellowship 2013-2015)
E-mail: rlibbrecht"at"rockefeller.edu

Romain is currently a postdoc at the University of Lausanne

Romain is interested in understanding the mechanisms regulating reproduction and behavior in insect societies. During his PhD at the University of Lausanne in Switzerland, he studied how genes and physiology affect the caste fate of the female offspring (fertile queen or sterile worker) and regulate the behavior of workers in ant colonies. As a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow in the Kronauer lab, Romain is currently investigating how epigenetic modifications regulate reproduction and behavior in the parthenogenetic ant Cerapachys biroi.




 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 Fall 2015Back (from left to right): Sean McKenzie (PhD student), Buck Trible (PhD student), Yuko Ulrich (postdoc), Leonora Olivos Cisneros (research specialist), Ingrid Fetter-Prun